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Article posted on Friday, 2nd November 2018
My education into all things railway continues. Whilst pottering about in the garden and garages I have been wheel counting again. My little 5" gauge 1361 saddle tank engine 0-6-0, hubby's larger 5" gauge Fowler, fondly known as the sugar cane engine 0-6-2. I have counted wheels on most of our models and was doing really well, including MONARCH that I managed to remember was 0-4-0-0-4-0 but that we have since discovered is classed as 0-4-0 + 0-4-0 as are all Kitson Meyer engines, don't forget the +. So, I thought I was getting the hang of it, that is until I entered our dining room and looked on the window sill.

A rather beautiful 3½" inch gauge black model of a loco with a tender has been sitting next to me at supper every night since we moved into this house. I rather blithely counted the wheels and very proudly announced to my other half that "Ionic" was a 2-4-0 tender engine. "Ah" he said "it may look like a 2-4-0 but the four large driving wheels are independently propelled so technically it is a 2-2-2-0". Typical I thought, caught out by an engine called "Ionic", now that is ironic.

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I squinted hard at the little engine and discovered that the connecting rods were indeed independent to the front and rear driving wheels. "That's interesting" I said and decided to do a spot of research.

I discovered that my husband's model is a copy of one of ten Teutonic locomotives built for London & North Western Railway between 1889 and 1890 at the Crewe works. It was designed by Frances (Frank) William Webb, Chief Engineer for L.N.W.R at that time, and was developed to feature one boiler delivering saturated steam (wet steam at boiling point not superheated), to two external (14") high pressure cylinders. These then exhaust into one (30") lower pressure cylinder inside the frames. All three cylinders have a stroke of 24". As is logical the two high pressure cylinders drove the two rear driving wheels whilst the lower pressure cylinder propelled the two leading wheels. As the Teutonic's driving wheels are not connected this type of locomotive is Duplex drive and may sometimes be called double-singles.

The positive advantage with this type of locomotive is of course the extra power afforded to the engine and also economy as the steam is used twice through the two-tier cylinders. I get the impression, however, that they were rather temperamental to operate. A lack of a reverser for the inside cylinder affords little control over the front wheel set movement, half a turn having to be achieved in these two wheels before all wheels were aligned to run in the same direction, in other words all sets of valve gear needed to be aligned to run in the same direction. This is however a personal observation and I may be doing this type of engine a great disservice.

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The Teutonic locomotives were a further development of the Dreadnaught class, the Teutonic's having larger wheels and modifications to the Joy valve gear. The later Teutonic's, a total of seven built in 1890, had their internal cylinders driven by a slip-eccentric valve gear. These engines were primarily designed and developed to meet the ever-increasing need for greater speed. 

The Teutonic's, although relatively few in number, became the most successful, and were the largest of F.W. Webb's 2-2-2-0 three-cylinder compound locomotives. They boasted 7'1" driving wheels compared to the Webb's smaller Dreadnaught 6' 3" driving wheels. The axle boxes were lubricated by oil rather than grease.

Interestingly all ten Teutonics, apart from one, were named after ships on the White Star Line. The odd one out is probably the most renowned and was named JEANIE DEANS after a character in The Walter Scott novel "The Heart of Midlothian". It was so named because it was exhibited at The Edinburgh International Exhibition of Electricity, Engineering, General Inventions and Industries in 1890. Jeanie Deans is one of Scott's most celebrated characters. 

The other nine locomotives are named below, and I am still pondering as to why there is a jump in the numbering of these great engines towards the end of 1890. Can anyone please enlighten me? 

 

 1301 TEUTONIC  1306 IONIC
 1302 OCEANIC  1307 COPTIC
 1303 PACIFIC   1309 ADRIATIC 
 1304 JEANIE DEANS  1311 CELTIC 
 1305 DORIC  1312 GALLIC 

 

Sadly, all these beautiful Locomotives were scrapped by June 1907

 

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